“What mattered most: Trust.

So what was the most important factor contributing to a team’s effectiveness? It was psychological safety. … Google describes it this way:

In a team with high psychological safety, teammates feel safe to take risks around their team members. They feel confident that no one on the team will embarrass or punish anyone else for admitting a mistake, asking a question, or offering a new idea.

… Here’s a glimpse at some of the actions that can help you build trust into your teams:

Listen first. To build trust, you must respect how others think and feel. That’s why it’s important to listen first. … you send the message that what’s important to them is important to you.

Show empathy. Beyond listening, try your best to understand your fellow team members and their perspectives. …

Be authentic. … We’re drawn to those who ‘keep it real,’ who realize that they aren’t perfect, but are willing to show those imperfections because they know everyone else has them, too. …

Set the example.  it’s so important to practice what you preach and set the example: You can preach respect and integrity all you want; it won’t mean a thing when you curse out a member of your team.

Be helpful. One of the quickest ways to gain someone’s trust is to help that person. … Trust is about the long game. Help wherever and whenever you can.

Disagree and commit. As Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos explains, to ‘disagree and commit’ doesn’t mean ‘thinking your team is wrong and missing the point’ … Rather, it’s a genuine, sincere commitment to go the team’s way, even if you disagree. …

Be humble. … it means recognizing that you don’t know everything–and that you’re willing to learn from others. …

Be transparent. There’s nothing worse than the feeling that leaders don’t care about keeping you in the loop, or even worse, that they’re keeping secrets. …

Commend sincerely and specifically.  As your colleagues notice that you appreciate their efforts, they’re naturally motivated to do more. The more specific, the better: Tell them what you appreciate, and why.”