Not sucking as a boss

By Marcel Schwantes via flipboard.com  Article

3 Daily Habits That Will Keep You From Sucking as a Boss

“What I have witnessed over the course of nearly fifteen years developing leaders is that the best of them are sincerely more interested in the success of their people than their own.

… ‘ultimately, a Servant Leader wants to help others thrive, and is happy to put their team’s needs before their own. They take the blame and give out the recognition. They care about employees as people all around and they understand that the best results are produced not through top-down delegation but by building people — and their skills — up.’ …

1. THEY ELEVATE PEOPLE THROUGH GENUINE CARING.

Great leaders support their people by showing an interest in their people’s jobs and career aspirations. They look into the future to create learning and development opportunities. … This is about emotional engagement. … Remember this quote by John C. Maxwell? ‘People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.’ …

2. THEY LEVERAGE EMPATHY TO BUILD RELATIONSHIPS AND DRIVE RESULTS.

Recently, global training giant Development Dimensions International (DDI) conducted an assessment of over 15,000 leaders from more than 300 organizations across 20 industries and 18 countries to determine which conversational skills have the greatest impact on overall performance.

The findings … pointed to empathy as the most critical driver of overall performance. Specifically, the ability to listen and respond with empathy. …

3. THEY ARE RADICALLY TRANSPARENT.

Last year, Chip Bergh, chief executive of Levi Strauss & Co., told The New York Times how he practices leadership transparency. …

I was at Procter & Gamble, which was a promote-from-within company that placed a huge emphasis on the role of the manager to develop their people. In fact, it was part of your performance review. My first hire was super smart, but he really wasn’t performing over time, and I felt pressure to get this guy promoted. I basically carried him and got him promoted. But about four months later, he was gone for performance reasons. The big lesson for me, and it stuck with me forever, is that you’ve got to be really transparent and straight with people, and if they’re not cutting it, you’ve got to tell them where they’re not cutting it. Hold the bar up high, and if it’s not a good fit, call it.

CLOSING THOUGHTS

… Let me ask you a look-in-the-mirror question: How well do you know the people that work for you?”

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