Bring out the extraordinary in others

February 25, 2013

By Geoffrey James via Inc.com   Article

13 Habits of Extraordinary Bosses

“Extraordinary bosses use these habits to bring out the extraordinary in those around them. …

1. They collaborate rather than grandstand …

2. The build communities  rather than platoons …

3. They create new realities. …

4. They laugh at problems (and themselves). …

5. They help others visualize a better future. …

6. They avidly explore new ideas. …

7. They mentor and coach. …

8. They use stories to inspire. …

9. They integrate pieces into wholeness. …

10. They tell the truth, even when inconvenient. …

11. They act before they have ALL the answers. …

12. They create a climate of trust. …

13. They make peace between factions. ….”

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“Fine”

February 25, 2013

Dilbert - Find v2Source


See what I did there?

February 25, 2013

By Melanie Pinola via fastcompany.com   Article

Get People To Say “Yes” With One Simple Conversational Trick

“There are lots of techniques for becoming more persuasive, but perhaps the simplest, most practical technique is the “But You Are Free” method. A review of 42 psychology studies (on 22,000 people) suggests this technique could double the chances someone would say “yes” to you. Read on to see how this works. If you want to, that is.

See what I did there? That’s the “But You Are Free” technique, basically: Make a request, but acknowledge the other person has a choice. PsyBlog explains that this persuasion technique reaffirms the person’s freedom of choice and indirectly tells the other person that you’re not threatening his/her ability right to say no.

The actual words you use don’t seem to matter; according to the meta-analysis published this year by Christopher Carpenter in Communication Studies, you could add to your request, “but obviously do not feel obliged” or “but you are free” and both would be effective–especially if you’re asking something of someone face-to-face.”


Down, up, or sideways

February 25, 2013

By John Shook via Lean Enterprise Institute   Article

Lead From The Front, Lead From Behind

“I am growing ever more leery of cries for “strong leadership” of the hero variety with the leader exercising command and control, telling the troops what to do. … As long as any system is dependent on “leadership” it is fragile and dependent – literally – on the individual who happens to be in charge today. Fans of charismatic or forceful leadership squirm at this message. But over time I have come to think that the real issue is learning to build systems that accomplish the things we advocate (problem solving culture, individuals engaged in continuous improvement, etc.). …

There are occasions that call for more directive leadership behavior and those that call for patient consensus building, always in pursuit of attaining organizational purpose. But, lean thinking in practice calls for more than just leadership that sways with the situation of the moment. Close examination reveals a few common denominators. Observable behaviors include demonstrations of respect for people, rigorous application of scientific thinking, and flexible application of practices to solve problems and continuously improve processes. Observable behaviors – things we can see; things we can choose to do.

Most important of all, lean leadership isn’t a matter of position, it’s a matter of action. Action that can be taken at any level, in any situation, and the leadership can work down, up, or sideways.”


Three Definitions of Power

February 25, 2013

By Ed Batista via Executive Coaching and Change Management blog   Article

“I define power (and seek to exercise it) differently in three specific contexts: Within myself, in a relationship with another person, and in a group

1. Power within myself is the ability to Express AND regulate my emotions

… becoming more skilled both at expressing my emotions, so that my impact is aligned with my intentions, and at regulating my emotions, so that while feeling them fully I choose when and how to express them in order to meet my needs. …

2. Power in a relationship is being Open to each other’s influence.

…  This is how ineffective leaders so often fail: they obtain compliance without actually changing anyone’s mind, and so their “power” extends only as far as their ability to monitor and police. …

3. Power in a group is feeling Free to speak my truth.

… A powerful group is one in which every member feels free to voice their perspective, even–and especially–when the leadership is ineffective. … while effective leaders will support a culture that encourages members to speak their truth, each member will ultimately have to exercise that power for themselves.”


Corporals and chefs

February 25, 2013

By David Sneed via coloradbiz.com   Article

Follow first—then lead

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“If you want to lead, you must first learn to follow. Ben Franklin said that. …

Companies that hire from within, selecting grunts who prove they can follow, are well-run and successful. A business degree is no more qualification to manage than a uniform makes a Marine, or a cookbook makes a chef. It isn’t the title – it’s what it took to get the title that matters.

Corporals and chefs are leaders because of the steps it takes to become one.

If you must read a book on leadership, find one that teaches you to follow and get that part down. Only then will you be fit for command.”


The Death of Core Competence Thinking

February 18, 2013

By  via Manufacturing Leadership Center   Article

“C. K. Prahalad and Gary Hamel wrote The Core Competence of the Corporation in the Harvard Business Review back in 1990 and it has been the rationale for outsourcing ever since. The logic behind it is the antithesis of lean thinking, and based 100% on a functional silo mentality. Twenty year old anti-lean thinking doesn’t die easily, but dying is exactly what the theory of core competence is doing, as anything that flies in the face of lean principles inevitably does.

The idea behind lean is that the entire process – the value stream – from the most basic supplier to the final end customer must be optimized. ‘Optimized’ means synchronizing, tightening, and integrating the sequence of steps so as to maximize the efforts creating value for that end customer, and eliminating anything and everything that is not contributing to customer value. Most of that waste – the steps, resources and money expended on activities that don’t add value – is the result of gaps and friction between the different functions along the value stream. Different departmental priorities, capacity imbalances, different planning methods and systems, and geographic space between functions are all typical drivers of waste.

Core Competence thinking ignores all of that – even adds to it. The idea behind it is that a company should pluck a step or two out of the process that it thinks it does particularly well – product engineering, say, or precision grinding – and outsource all of the rest to someone else who thinks those other vale adding steps is more in their wheelhouse. That is the path GE and just about everyone else went down. The hole in the thinking – the problems and waste that inevitably results from disconnecting the value stream – has finally become apparent.”