Would marketing be better at HR?

January 31, 2011

Should HR leaders turn over their internal communications and engagement efforts to marketing professionals?

“According to an executive briefing by the Madison Performance Group — entitled HR or Marketing: Who is Better Equipped to Manage Employee Engagement? — “marketing has evolved particularly fast in using digital media to deliver messages that are more efficient and impactful” when it comes to building a more engaged workforce. … “Some business leaders wonder if marketing shouldn’t also be charged with building and maintaining the corporate connection with employees.” …

Mark Royal, a senior consultant with Hay Group’s Chicago office, marketing professionals do have wisdom to share.They “could provide useful guidance,” he says, “related to segmenting audiences, tailoring messages and leveraging different communication channels that would serve HR professionals well in reaching an increasingly diverse workforce in ways that resonate and motivate.” – Article

According to an executive briefing by the Madison Performance Group — entitled HR or Marketing: Who is Better Equipped to Manage Employee Engagement? — “marketing has evolved particularly fast in using digital media to deliver messages that are more efficient and impactful” when it comes to building a more engaged workforce.

Time for the scissors

January 31, 2011

Source


The truth about American innovation

January 31, 2011

“Sure, it was positive that President Obama used the word “innovate” so many times in his State of the Union Tuesday, for example, saying “we need to out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world.” But Bruce Nussbaum‘s day-later reaction in the Harvard Business Review argues “harsh truths” President Obama omitted include that very little actual innovation takes place within big business, that the U.S. innovation policy is misguided, and that China‘s “Fast Follower” policy is superior to ours. After a R&D survey showed that only 9 percent of U.S. companies had any product, service, or process innovation between 2006 and 2008, economist Michael Mandel observed, “you can’t be an innovation economy if only 9 percent of your companies are innovating.” – Source


Microsoft desperately needs to …

January 31, 2011

“I’ll start with a rundown of mergers and acquisitions announced by major Internet and tech companies since the beginning of this year, which, notably, is less than a month ago:

Google acquired eBook Technologies (12 Jan), SayNow and fflick (25 Jan)

Facebook acquired Rel8tion (25 Jan)

Amazon acquired LOVEFiLM (20 Jan)

Skype acquired Qik (13 Jan)

Yahoo7 (a joint venture between Seven Media Group and Yahoo) acquired Spreets (21 Jan)

Groupon acquired SoSasta, Grouper, Twangoo (11 Jan) and GroupsMore (26 Jan)

Zynga acquired Flock (5 Jan) and Area/Code (21 Jan)

LinkedIn acquired CardMunch (26 Jan)

Salesforce acquired DimDim (6 Jan)

LivingSocial bought a majority stake in Let’s Bonus (13 Jan).

Dell acquired SecureWorks (3 Jan)

Concur acquired TripIt (13 Jan)

I could go on for a while, but by now you see where I’m going with this.

Since October 2010, Microsoft has announced exactly zero acquisitions, joining struggling companies like Myspace and Nokia for that dubious honor ….

Then there’s of course Apple, which has been notoriously non-acquisitive ever since the company was founded back in the seventies.

In fact, for the full year of 2010, Microsoft announced only two acquisitions of small companies, namely Canesta and AVIcode. The contrast with rival Google’s M&A activity (roughly 25 acquisitions in 2010) was particularly staggering.” –Article


It’s how you behave when you strike out

January 31, 2011

Failing well

Failure sucks. … I’m not sure I’ve read much about “how” to fail, since failure is so depressing and negative. But I’m here to tell you that there is a good way to fail and that there are steps for positively managing the aftermath. I’ve seen it done well, I’ve seen it done poorly and I’ve done it myself, so I certainly have some well-formed views on the topic.” – Article

in the VC business, if you hit .300, you are doing well. if you hit .400, you are going to the hall of fame. but it is how you behave when you strike out that defines your reputation.” Comment left on above article. – Source


There is no good debt

January 31, 2011

“author David Bach shares the following about how he responded when someone asked him about “good debt” versus “bad debt”:

Almost automatically, I started giving her the standard answer about how good debts are generally considered to be debts you incur to buy things that can go up in value—like a home or a college education—while bad debts are things like credit card balances, where you’ve borrowed money to buy things that will depreciate or go down in value, like most consumer goods. But then I stopped in mid-answer and looked at her.

“You know something?” I said. “The truth is that this recession has changed everything. Homes are going down in value and people with college degrees are looking for jobs. Forget what I was just telling you. Forget about the idea of ‘good debt’ and ‘bad debt.’ Th e truth is that when you’re in debt, it doesn’t matter what you’ve borrowed the money for. The only thing that matters is whether or not you can afford to pay it back. And if you can’t, all debt is bad debt.”

He follows this up with what he calls the best investment you can make now:

The best investment you can make over the next five years is going to be paying off your debts. So my advice is to pay off what you owe as fast as you can. The faster you pay off your debt, the faster you will achieve financial freedom.

Welcome to the light side, David. ;-)” – Article


Curious George

January 30, 2011

The leader’s secret weapon

Peter Drucker famously said, “My greatest strength as a consultant is to be ignorant and ask a few questions.”

“5 Tips

  1. Curious leaders stop having all the answers and start having all the questions. The problem with answers is they don’t teach you anything. In some ways, answers end thinking.
  2. Curious leaders reflect healthy confidence. Weak leaders don’t ask question for fear of looking weak. If you want to look strong while asking a question say, “Tell me more.”

Article